Forest pupils celebrate as A* is the most common grade awarded for a fifth year

Following on from last week’s excellent A-level results, Forest is delighted to reveal that 89% of all GCSE grades awarded to Forest pupils are A*, A or B, while 68% of all GCSE grades are A* or A and 35% of grades are A*.

71% of pupils achieved at least five A* or A grades, while 63% achieved at least six A* or A grades. The A* grade has now been the most common GCSE results for Forest pupils for the past five years.

All of the school’s Year 11 pupils were also entered for the Higher Project Qualification (HPQ), a high-level research project favoured by universities. 88% of all HPQ grades awarded to Forest pupils are A* or A, 97% are A*, A or B.

Congratulations must go to Conor Reynolds and Grace Oswald who both achieved 10 A*/A grades, with both receiving an A in Astronomy which was taken as an extra subject outside of the timetable. Another fantastic result was achieved by Jesse Chan, who received 10 A*/A including one in Chinese.

Jonathan Mitchell, Forest’s Deputy Head Academic, said: “We are exceptionally proud of our hardworking pupils and their teachers for this set of amazing GCSE results. For the fifth year in a row the A* grade is the most common grade at Forest, and our pupils add these tremendous full GCSE results to the amazing results they had already achieved in the Higher Project Qualification earlier in the year.

“It’s also vitally important to mark the achievements of those pupils who have worked hard to achieve great results for them personally, at whatever level, and we pay a special tribute to those Foresters whose dedication and diligence has enabled them to surprise themselves this year.

“At Forest we strongly believe it is the combination of strong academic learning at GCSE, independent study for the HPQ and a rich co-curricular life that characterises successful pupils, and enables them to flourish in the future. It gives us great pleasure to work with Forest pupils who excel so obviously in all of these areas.”

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